Posts

The Sharing Economy and IT Metrics

Gov_logoI recently authored a piece for Governing on how the sharing economy has interesting implications for the future of local governments. Click here for the article. This paper is based on a research study that my team completed on how technology is shaping the future of government. The complete report will be released by the Brookings Institution.

 

fcw-logoMy article with Alison Sutherland on information technology metrics appeared in the April 15 print edition of Federal Computer Week. Click here to see the article. The web version of the article is available here.

Dashboards, More Cybersecurity, Citizen Disengagement, and …

It has been a busy few weeks, so here are some research updates:

Centralization of IT Governance in the Public Sector

HICSS-b1James Denford, Gregory Dawson, and I have a paper accepted for presentation at the Forty-Eighth Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences.

An Argument for Centralization of IT Governance in the Public Sector

Using a configurational crisp set Qualitative Comparative Analysis (csQCA) approach, we find that effective public sector IT governance is structured differently than in the private sector. While states adopt a variety of IT governance structures, it is unmistakable that centralized yields better organizational outcomes than decentralized. As such, this paper makes a case for additional research in public sector governance in order to understand and explain these differences.

Jim Denford will present the paper at the conference. Click here for the conference program.

We have written several practitioner notes based on this paper, see InformationWeek and Brookings Tech Tank.

Capturing the Wisdom of Crowds – Planning

APAI have an article in the current issue of the American Planning Association's Planning magazine.

Capturing the Wisdom of Crowds

Combining citizen intelligence and online civic platforms.

By Kevin C. Desouza and Kendra L. Smith

Technology platforms for citizen intelligence are springing up quickly. Platforms such as Deliberatorium, DebateGraph, Cohere, YourView, and CoPe_it! all allow for extensive discourse. Each has special features such as multiple ways to contact other users and participate in discussion boards. Additionally, these platforms employ social analytics, discourse analytics, and social network maps. These sites allow users to gather information and debate ideas and solutions to specific community issues.

Users can also add evidence and information to other users' claims, which triggers conversations and sharing. In many U.S. cities, leaders are finding value in citizen intelligence. Online civic platforms tend to fall into four main categories, as one of us has also noted in an upcoming Journal of Urban Technology article. To read the more, please click here.

To read the print version, please click here.

Chennai: City Profile – Cities

30396Rashmi Krishnamurthy and I have a paper accepted in Cities

Cities around the world are experiencing tremendous population growth, and this is especially true in the developing world. In this profile, we feature the city of Chennai, the capital of Tamil Nadu, India. Chennai is the largest industrial commercial center in South India; it is often referred as the “Detroit of India” and the “Gateway to South India.” In recent decades, large industrial facilities have been established in Chennai and its suburbs—resulting in large-scale population growth. However, this explosive growth has strained the urban infrastructure of this prominent city. In this profile, we provide an overview of Chennai’s urban history from social, economic, political, and environmental perspectives. We highlight the current and future challenges faced by the city, and we argue that it is well poised to leverage emerging smart city technologies. However, to effectively implement these technologies, city administrators need to undertake several measures; for example, a database capturing all dimensions of the city must be developed. By clearly delineating the urban planning and policy efforts to the present and offering a way forward, this paper contributes to the growing literature on smart cities and the unique urban challenges faced by cities in the developing world.  

The Perils of Petascale IT Projects

PetascaleITProjectsI have an article published in the current issue of FCW: The Business of Federal Technology on petascale IT projects.

Good news: We no longer have to talk about megascale IT projects. Large-scale ventures that typically cost $1 billion or more, megaprojects used to be all the rage, but they are quickly being superseded by petascale IT initiatives. Those projects can cost even more, involve complexity on a truly massive scale and require petaflops of computer processing. Despite the horrendous track record of delivering on even moderately complex IT projects, public-sector CIOs continue to embrace the design, planning and execution of petascale IT projects. To read more, please click here.

To view the article in the digital edition of the magazine, please click here.

Measuring IT Value: Designing Metrics and Dashboards

IBM For a third year in a row, I have been fortunate to receive a grant from the IBM Center for the Business of Government.

Measuring IT Value in the Public Sector:  Designing Metrics and Dashboards

IT investments are varied, unique, and integral to all efforts including service delivery, citizen engagement, and running of internal business processes. While it is commonly accepted that IT investments have organizational value, quantifying the value impact of IT remains elusive. Metrics can be a powerful mechanism for agencies to assess and achieve their goals in an intelligent, evidence-driven manner. They offer agencies the ability to identify problems, target issues, evaluate processes, establish performance goals, monitor efforts and communicate results. This report will study how CIOs employ metrics for evaluating IT investments and projects, and can communicate the value of IT to stakeholders both within and beyond their agency.

Past reports published my the IBM Center for the Business of Government

Intrapreneurship – Government Technology

download Kendra Smith and I wrote a piece for Government Technology on Intrapreneurship. Public agencies need to build a capacity for intrapreneurship. Intrapreneurs invent new practices, programs, and solutions to address problems and opportunities faced by an organization. These individuals are passionate about the organizations they work for and do not just accept the status quo. They bootstrap and bootleg, they might be viewed as radical (or guerilla) by their peers, and they want to move their organizations ahead. To read more, please click here.

Talks in Norway – BI, Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, and SINTEF

Starting on Thursday, I will be visiting Norway to give several invited lectures. My first stop will be at the BI Norwegian Business School in Oslo. I will be delivering my talk to the Leadership and Organizational Behaviour group.

imagesDisastrous Large-Scale Technology Projects in the Public Sector: Unpacking Complexity
I will examine what accounts for ‘complexity’ when we consider large-scale technology projects in the public sector. There are several examples of such projects from the IRS Business Systems Modernization to the Seattle Monorail Project and, most recently, healthcare.gov. Complexity could arise from the ‘public’ nature of these efforts. Issues to be considered include: the ability to manage expectations of a diverse stakeholder population, the lack of capabilities when it comes to IT management and governance, the fact that these projects are laden with a higher-level of risk from the start as the efforts have a higher degree of innovativeness, setting up of false expectations, escalation of commitments, etc. The paper develops a series of propositions based on data drawn from cases of large-scale technology projects that have turned out to be disasters. A theoretical model is put forth for consideration.

ntnuI will then head up to Trondheim, where I will deliver a talk to the Norwegian University of Science and Technology. The talk titled, Data Governance versus Big Computation: Tortoise and the Hare, draws on my current work on big data and analytics for the public good.

Over the last few years, we have certainly seen a flurry of activity around big data. Widespread efforts by a number of academic communities – including computer science, engineering, mathematics, and statistics - have led to advancements in how we capture, store, analyze, visualize, and apply big data. Unfortunately, these advancements have not kept up with innovations in data governance. Deficiencies in data governance limit our ability to truly take advantage of computational advances. In this talk, I will highlight challenges and opportunities in data governance in the context of big data. I will draw on illustrative examples from my work in big data in the public sector and from tackling social challenges (e.g. countering human trafficking).

sintefDuring my visit to Trondheim, I will also spend time with researchers at SINTEF, the largest independent research organization in
Scandinavia, discussing issues of knowledge management and process improvement in the context of software engineering systems and organizations.