Local Government 2035: Strategic Trends and Implications of New Technologies

11295579_10155567198015471_2381307221559114104_nToday, the Brookings Institution released the Local Government 2035: Strategic Trends and Implications of New Technologies paper as part of the Issues in Technology Innovation series.

Technological change is increasingly disruptive and destabilizing. In order to maintain effective governance systems, public sector entities must overcome stagnant tendencies and take a proactive stance—acting in the face of impending technological innovations. Future government entities must evolve into lean, responsive, and adaptive organizations capable of rapid response to societal shifts.

In this paper, we illustrate how technological advancements, such as the proliferation of drone technologies, artificial intelligence, autonomous vehicles, and peer-2-peer services, will introduce data privatization challenges and destabilize existing governance systems. In order to maintain effective service delivery, public sector entities must increasingly consider the ramifications technology will have on income inequality, fragile and conflict states, and immigration—just to name a few.

They conclude by urging policymakers and government managers to chart out trends based on data, model the interactions within complex systems, and study the pathways towards outcomes to unearth intended and unintended consequences of strategic choices. The authors argue that designing a path forward for local governments will require deliberate collaboration among diverse stakeholders, an immersive engagement with the data and scenarios that will shape local communities, and employment of decision-tools to model and simulate alternatives.

Click here to download the paper.

Essen and Münster – Research Presentations and AIS Council Meetings

Aufmacher_allg_BottropI am heading to Germany for the week. First stop will be in Essen, where I will be deliver two lectures at Hochschule Ruhr West: University of Applied Sciences.  

Disentangling Management of Information Systems in the Public Sector

Information systems are critical assets that need to be strategically leveraged in the public sector. Yet, we know little when it comes to IT governance in the public sector. Testament to this statement is the constant barrage of negative press on cyber attacks, to blockbuster IT project failures, and inability to leverage IT for innovation. In this presentation, I will highlight lessons learned from several research projects that have examined management of IS issues in the public sector from performance metrics, to big and open data, cybersecurity, the design and implementation of strategic IS plans, crowdsourcing platforms, and CIOs. These lessons will be framed in the broader context of how we might disentangle complexities associated with the designing, planning, and management strategic information systems in the public sector.

Challenges in Inter-Disciplinary Research: Strategies from Crafting Research Ideas to Publishing.

In this presentation, I will share my experiences in executing inter-disciplinary research projects. Studying complex phenomenon requires us to undertake research that (1) draws on multiple disciplines, (2) engages a diverse group of stakeholders, (3) appreciates a plurality of research approaches, and (4) communicates to a diverse set of audiences. Executing inter-disciplinary research is no easy feat to accomplish. Researchers face daunting challenges from the onset, beginning with the inception of ideas, then continuing to the crafting of problem statements, executing the research process, and communicating the results via publications in academic and practitioner outlets. However, these challenges should not be viewed as an excuse to abandon inter-disciplinary research in favor of narrow-minded and singular research exercises, which reduce complex phenomenon in deterministic fashions so as to arrive at irrelevant solutions. I will present a method (process) for executing inter-disciplinary research that has served me well. Illustrative examples of research projects will be used to exemplify this process and outline strategies for researchers to consider when conducting inter-disciplinary research projects. I will also highlight when it is time to ‘kill’ theories and concepts in order to promote radical innovation.

For more details, see link.

Next, I head to Münster for the European Conference on Information Systems (ECIS) and the Association for Information Systems Council Meetings.

The Sharing Economy and IT Metrics

Gov_logoI recently authored a piece for Governing on how the sharing economy has interesting implications for the future of local governments. Click here for the article. This paper is based on a research study that my team completed on how technology is shaping the future of government. The complete report will be released by the Brookings Institution.

 

fcw-logoMy article with Alison Sutherland on information technology metrics appeared in the April 15 print edition of Federal Computer Week. Click here to see the article. The web version of the article is available here.

Dashboards, More Cybersecurity, Citizen Disengagement, and …

It has been a busy few weeks, so here are some research updates:

AIS Council Meetings and ICIS – Auckland

icis 2014 logo 170x171I will be heading to  Auckland, New Zealand for the International Conference on Information Systems. First, I will be attending the AIS Council meetings for two days prior to the conference. I serve as the VP of Communication for the Association for Information Systems.

Second, I will participate as a faculty mentor for the Mid-Career Consortium.

Third, during the conference I will participate on the AIS Grand Vision for ICT-enabled Bright Society panel along with my colleagues - Helmut Krcmar - Technische Universität München; Jae Kyu Lee - Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology; Jane Fedorowicz - Bentley University; Ramayya Krishnan - Carnegie Mellon University.

Global societal knowledge infrastructures and communication platforms have made life and business more efficient and effective. However, many serious side effects have emerged alongside these ICT platforms, imperiling the future of this foundation. AIS is developing an initiative to investigate these problems and to envision the future of an ICT-enabled Bright Society. The initiative will encompass the development of relevant technologies, business models, public policies, social norms, international agreements, metrics of measuring national progress, and so forth. This endeavor will create many research opportunities to make AIS research outcomes more available to and significant for society.

BIG Ideas, Economic Resilience, Alliance for Innovation

I will be attending  the BIG Ideas Conference hosted by the Alliance for Innovation in Fort Lauderdale. I co-authored one of the discussion papers for the conference with Kendra Smith. The paper takes a critical look at what it takes to build cities and communities that are economically resilient.

Economic Resilience: No Big Ideas Needed!

Resilience is one of the most bastardized terms when it comes to planning and management jargon. We all want resilience, yet it means drastically different things to many people. To some, resilience is the ability to respond to shocks and abrasions in the environment, while others think of resilience as the ability to continuously innovate and stay ahead of the curve so as not to become obsolete. Economic vulnerability and economic resilience play a strong role in cities’ resilience. Economic vulnerability is an entities proneness to exogenous shocks coming from economic features such as economic openness, export concentration, and dependence on strategic imports. Economic resilience is the ability of an organization, whether it is a business or a city or even a country, to withstand the impacts of financial and economic shocks and to bounce back quickly, or to avoid shocks through proactive planning and interventions. In this paper, we will explore the many facets of economic resilience, drivers of economic resilience, investing in resilience, and the risks of resilience planning. Additionally, we will offer domestic and international examples of cities that have experience with resilience planning, either through risk reduction or after-the-fact resilience planning. Finally, we will conclude with a discussion on the realities of economic resilience.

Please email me if you would like a copy of the paper.

I also serve on the Board of Directors for the Alliance for Innovation and am looking forward to engaging discussions during our board meetings.

Universidad de Chile – Centro de Sistemas Públicos

Picture1I will be delivering a presentation at the Centro de Sistemas Públicos, Universidad de Chile on October 3, 2014. My talk will be part of the day long event, INNOVACIÓN PÚBLICA: MUCHO RUIDO ¿Y LAS NUECES?, organized by the Industrial Engineering department and CEPAL. My remarks will focus on how should we go about building a capacity for intrapreneurship in the public sector. Click here to view the complete program. For more details on my intrapreneurship work, see my book and one of my recent articles.

 

 

University of Jyväskylä – Opponent for PhD Dissertation

jyu-logo-hdpiI am looking forward to my upcoming trip to Finland (Sept 25-29). I will be visiting the University of Jyväskylä to serve as an opponent for Henri Pirkkalainen's dissertation defense, Globally distributed Knowledge Sharing in Social Software Environments: Barriers and Interventions. Click here to read more details on the event. The event will be broadcasted live [webcast].

The Perils of Petascale IT Projects

PetascaleITProjectsI have an article published in the current issue of FCW: The Business of Federal Technology on petascale IT projects.

Good news: We no longer have to talk about megascale IT projects. Large-scale ventures that typically cost $1 billion or more, megaprojects used to be all the rage, but they are quickly being superseded by petascale IT initiatives. Those projects can cost even more, involve complexity on a truly massive scale and require petaflops of computer processing. Despite the horrendous track record of delivering on even moderately complex IT projects, public-sector CIOs continue to embrace the design, planning and execution of petascale IT projects. To read more, please click here.

To view the article in the digital edition of the magazine, please click here.

Big Data and Urban Informatics at UIC

logoILChicagoI am in Chicago to attend the NSF sponsored Workshop on Big Data and Urban Informatics. I will chair the Crisis and Emergency Informatics track and will present the following paper.

‘Big’ Data + ‘Open’ Data + ‘Mobile’ Data: Urban Informatics

I take the view of a city as a platform. As a platform, a city has infrastructure, processes, organizations, individuals, and technology as components. Additionally, cities are comprised of technical (e.g. sensors), social (e.g. humans), and socio-technical components (e.g. processes). The glue that holds these components together and enables integration and coordination to occur is data and information. The effective and efficient management of information is not only critical to ensure that each of the components operate optimally but also ensures that the overall system, the city, achieves its overall objectives. In this paper, I focus on three key data dimensions in the context of urban informatics: big, open, and mobile data. Key issues within each data dimension are presented. The paper builds on several research projects on smart cities, urban informatics, and policy informatics. Data collected during these projects includes over 45 case studies, over 60 interviews with key informants, analysis of over several thousand pages secondary data, and an examination of over 70 technology solutions that span mobile apps, online crowdsourcing platforms, sensors, analytical and visualization technologies, and associated urban technologies. The paper puts forth several considerations that need to be accounted for when discussing the potential of data and technologies to transform our urban spaces towards the goals of making them intelligent, livable, sustainable, and resilient.