Sustaining Innovation: Challenges for Incumbent Firms

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A paper that I co-authored with Ashley Braganza (Brunel University) and Yukika Awazu (Bentley University) appears in the current issue of Research-Technology Management.

In today's competitive environment, the ability of an organization to innovate is paramount. While most organizations have flashes or spurts of innovation, only a handful have been able to innovate on a continuous and sustained basis. This paper surveys the challenges faced by firms when trying to build sustainable innovation programs. These findings have been derived from an examination of innovation programs in over 30 organizations in North America, Europe and Asia.

Braganza, A., Awazu, Y., and Desouza, K.C. “Sustaining Innovation is Challenge for Incumbents,” Research-Technology Management, 52(4), 2009, 46-56.

To access the paper, please click here [LINK]

Paper on Information and Knowledge Management within Public Sector Networks accepted at the International Journal of Public Administration

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I have a new paper accepted for publication. The paper, “Information and Knowledge Management in Public Sector Networks: The Case of the US Intelligence Community” will appear in the International Journal of Public Administration.

This paper contributes to the public management literature by exploring the critical challenges that underpin the construction of robust information and knowledge management strategies in networked settings. The ability of the network to sustain itself, thrive, and achieve its objectives depends on the success that the network has in organizing and coordinating its constituent organizations. The network’s collaborative information and knowledge management strategy is critical to the functioning of the network and the achievement of objectives. A robust information and knowledge management strategy will bring organizations in the network together, help them share resources, collaborate on efforts, and further their objectives in a holistic manner. An inadequate information and knowledge management strategy might lead to disconnects in organizations due to lack of information sharing, poor collaborative knowledge generation, lack of coordination, leading to a fragmented network. Drawing on a multi-year, multi-method, and multi-organization study of the United States Intelligence Community (USIC), the paper puts forth a comprehensive framework to examine information and knowledge management challenges within the USIC, as well as other organizations.

On Information Management, Environmental Sustainability, and Cradle to Cradle Mentalities

default_coverPeter Ellis (http://www.petercellis.com/), a graduate student at the University of Washington Information School,  and I have authored a new paper on Green IT. The paper, “On Information Management, Environmental Sustainability, and Cradle to Cradle Mentalities”, has been accepted for publication at Business Information Review.

Abstract:
Attempting to merge the topics of environmental sustainability and information management, this paper works towards defining both fields and constructing a viable framework that creates a strong relationship between the two topics. Reviewing literature on information management and environmental sustainability, this paper argues that the two topics must become inseparable – the work in one discipline must inform and advance the other. The need to do so is further underscored by the evolving nature of both disciplines.

Crafting Organizational Innovation Processes – Innovation: Management, Policy & Practice

Crafting Organizational Innovation Processes” appears in the current issue of Innovation: Management, Policy & Practice

I co-authored this paper with Caroline Dombrowski (The Information School, University of Washington), Yukika Awazu (McCallum Graduate School of Business, Bentley College), Peter Baloh (Faculty of Economics, University of Ljubljana), Sridhar Papagari (Dept of Information & Decision Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago), Jeffrey Y Kim (The Information School, University of Washington), and Sanjeev Jha (Dept of Information & Decision Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago).

Research for this paper was funded by the Institute for Innovation in Information Management, University of Washington as part of the Leveraging Ideas for Organizational Innovation research project.

Abstract
Innovation is a crucial component of business strategy, but the process of innovation may seem difficult to manage. To plan organizational initiatives around innovation or to bolster innovation requires a firm grasp of the innovation process. Few organizations have transparently defined such a process. Based on the findings of an exploratory study of over 30 US and European companies that have robust innovation processes, this paper breaks down the innovation process into discrete stages: idea generation and mobilization, screening and advocacy, experimentation, commercialization, and diffusion and implementation. For each stage, context, outputs and critical ingredients are discussed. There are several common tensions and concerns at each stage, which are enumerated; industry examples are also given. Finally, strategies for and indicators of organizational success around innovation are discussed for each stage. Successful organizations will use an outlined innovation process to create a common framework for discussion and initiatives around the innovation process, and to establish metrics and goals for each stage of the innovation process.

Paper accepted at 4th International Conference on Design Science Research in Information Systems and Technology (DESRIST 09)

I have a paper accepted at the 4th International Conference on Design Science Research in Information Systems and Technology (DESRIST 09). The paper, Towards a Knowledge Needs-Technology Fit Model for Knowledge Management Systems, is co-authored with Peter Baloh (University of Ljubljana). This paper is based on Peter’s dissertation. I continue to have the honor to serve as the chair of his dissertation committee.

Abstract
The goal of this paper is twofold. The first goal is to provide an illustrative example of design science research, from the crafting of a research question to the execution of the research. As such, it satisfies the academic reader and practitioner who will benefit from seeing how design science research guidelines, as proposed by Hevner et al. (2004), can be rigorously followed in a practically relevant setting. The second goal is to provide a methodological contribution to the design science area by arguing for the need to add an exploratory step in the ‘build’ phase of a new design science artifact. This paper thus adds to the Hevner et al. (2004) guidelines by explicitly calling for an exploratory empirical study before actually going into the evaluation phase of design science study.

Securing Information Assets – Business Information Review

I have a new article published in Business Information Review (LINK).

In today’s competitive environment, organizations succeed or fail based on how well they manage information. To address this reality, organizations spend millions, if not billions, on securing their information advantages. New information technologies and methodologies are adopted, while old ones are dismantled or upgraded. To win, the information manager must constantly seek to outperform his or her competition. In this article the author asks how he or she does it? Perhaps by acquiring the best new technologies, hiring the most intelligent information professionals, and continuously keeping a watchful eye on the future. But, he asks, does having the best information, the best information systems, and the best information professionals, really pay off? Is there victory in sight? Or, is this just a continuous game with no clear winners? [To read more…LINK]

Desouza, K.C. “Securing Information Assets: The Great Information Game,” Business Information Review, 26 (1), 35-41.

P.S. The journal contains a brief feature on my background and research interest. See “Contributor Profile,” Business Information Review, 26 (1), 42-43.

Harvard Business Review Polska – Outsourcing

I was interviewed by Harvard Business Review Polska on the future of outsourcing. The interview was conducted in conjunction with the launching of the Polish Edition of The Outsourcing Handbook (Kogan Page, 2006). The Polish Edition was released in 2008 - Outsourcing: Podr?cznik sprawdzonych praktyk, Warsaw, Poland: Wydawnictwo MT Biznes.

The interview appears in the January issue of Harvard Business Review Polska. I was also quoted in the “10 pu?apek projektów outsourcingowych,” which appears in the same issue.

WorldChanging Seattle – Writing and Publishing Free Textbooks

A nice article on efforts to create a free textbook on Change Management appeared on the WorldChanging Seattle website.

Tulinsky, J. “A Wiki Approach to Writing and Publishing Free Textbooks,” WorldChanging Seattle, January 7, 2009, Available Online at: http://www.worldchanging.com/local/seattle/archives/009273.html

To read about the project, please see - Ideas4Change Blog [LINK].
To learn more about the Global Text Project [LINK]

Reflections on South Africa…Blog Famous?

My blog post on reflections from South Africa has been making headlines on a number of South African’s sites. I spent little over 2 months in South Africa as a visiting professor at the University of the Witwatersrand. See some of the following sites ---