Speaking at the Society for Information Management’s Advanced Practices Council

headerI will be presenting my research on innovation and intrapreneurship to the Advanced Practices Council (APC) of the Society of Information Management. This presentation is based on my recent book, Intrapreneurship: Managing Ideas within Your Organization, and will take place in Atlanta, GA on January 22, 2013.

desouzabookAn organization’s ability to compete and continuously renew itself is contingent upon how well it leverages the idea creators in its midst. When organizations fail to leverage their employees' ideas and when employees stumble in their ability to effectively manage those ideas, the loss of energy at all levels – from individuals to organizations and even to society – is tremendous. In this presentation, I will outline how to drive change within organizations through a focus on intrapreneurship. Intrapreneurship-focused organizations give employees resources, time, and budgets to work on their own ideas because they know that creating space for their employees to be inventive may yield the most valuable contributions. Moreover, these organizations do not simply give employees space and then forget about them. They know how to hold employees accountable for their ideas, support employees in their efforts to develop and commercialize ideas, and encourage the intrapreneurial spirit. Drawing on my research and experience consulting with thirty global organizations, I outlines ways to manage all types of ideas, including blockbusters with the potential to create radically new external products and services, and more incremental innovations for improving internal processes. With practical frameworks and real life examples for both employees and managers, I will help you to identify the value in your own ideas and those of others to ultimately benefit your organization. In today’s competitive environment, an organization is only as good as its ability to manage ideas. Successful organizations will be able to design, build, implement, and sustain intrapreneurship processes that are superior to those of their competitors. It is through these processes that organizations will be able to act quickly and effectively to introduce new products and services, avoid blind spots, and attract and retain the best minds around.

Designing and Planning for Smart(er) Cities – Practicing Planner

aicpsignatureYou can find my article on smart cities in the current issue of Practicing Planner.

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Abstract: Within the past 24 months the concept of smart (and intelligent) cities has been become popular in the media. For instance, Scientific American ran a special issue on smart cities (September 2011). Industry players such as IBM and Siemens have specific programs and practices dedicated to advancing the cause of building smart cities. Despite its intuitive appeal, we have limited knowledge within the design, planning, and policy fields about the dimensions of the concept of smart cities, and limited practical experience regarding the barriers and potential opportunities. The term smart city is still new and appears to mean different things within different fields. In some ways the term is both complex and vague. Some experts use the term smart city to highlight advances in sustainability and greening of the city, while others use the term to portray infusion of information via technologies to better the lives of citizens. Even others consider the presence of high-level citizen engagement in the design and governance of the space as a key attribute of smarter cities. Therefore, no consensus exists within the academy on the characteristics of smart cities and how they fit within existing conceptual frameworks, such as sustainability and policy informatics. Although there is not yet consensus on a definition, I posit the following definition: A smart city is livable, resilient, sustainable, and designed through open and collaborative governance. The objective of this paper is to provide a preliminary conceptual framework for researchers, policymakers, and planners to apply in their design and development of smart cities. In light of the growing popular appeal of smart cities, I hope this essay will serve as a call to action for planners who must confront the day-to-day challenge of designing, developing, and retrofitting cities to make them smarter.

To access the article, please click here.

Technology Analysis & Strategic Management – Cloud Computing Business Models

TASMAlong with my colleagues at the Faculty of EconomicsUniversity of Ljubljana, I have a paper forthcoming in Technology Analysis & Strategic ManagementThe paper, Disruptive Technologies: A Business Model Perspective on Cloud Computing how Amazon.com, Salesforce.com and Siebel responded to the disruptive power of the cloud computing technology.

DaSilva, C.M., Trkman, P., Desouza, K.C., and Lindic, J., “Disruptive Technologies: A Business Model Perspective on Cloud Computing,” Technology Analysis & Strategic Management, Forthcoming.

P.S. I hold a visiting professorship at the University of Ljubljana.

IBM Center for the Business of Government Grant – Big Data and Public Agencies

For a second year in a row, I have been fortunate to receive a grant from the IBM Center for the Business of Government.

Project: Building Analytical Capabilities for Big Data in the Public Sector: From Paralysis to Analysis

The goal of this project is to arrive at an actionable framework for federal agencies to navigate the 'big' data management challenge. We will interview Chief Information Officers (CIOs) who are leading 'big' data projects at federal, state, and local agencies to understand the challenges they face and their attempts to navigate opportunities provided by 'big' and 'open' data. We will administer a survey to measures technical, processes, people, and organizational factors that impact an agency's readiness and experience with big data management. An actionable framework will be developed that outlines how public agencies should proceed to create a roadmap towards devising analytical capabilities for big data management.

To learn more about my prior project on Challenge.gov, please click here.

My Research Mind – A Little Messy

I have been doing some reflection on my research interests and the connections between the various scientific domains in which I work. I will be on a panel, Working on Mars while Living on Earth - Balancing Demands across Disciplinary Boundaries, with Sandeep Purao (Penn State University), Ajay Vinze (Arizona State University), and Steve Sawyer (Syracuse University) at the 22nd Workshop on Information Systems and Technology where I will share some of my lessons learnt in doing interdisciplinary research and holding academic appointments in various disciplinary units from business schools to information schools and urban studies to public administration.

For a sneak preview here is a graphical description of my research spheres.

Below is a graphical description of my research trajectory mapped across various dimensions.

Policy Informatics in Communications of the AIS

I have a new paper accepted for publication in the Communications of the AIS. The paper outlines the case for IS researchers to pay attention to the budding field of policy informatics.

In this paper we introduce policy informatics as an emerging research space. Policy informatics is the study of how information systems are leveraged towards solving complex public policy problems. Leveraging information systems requires: (1) platforms for citizens to participate and engage in policy processes and with public agencies; (2) public agencies to utilize technologies to take advantage of information reservoirs for evidence-driven policy design; and (3) public agencies to be more transparent, participatory, and collaborative. Presented in this paper is one illustrative application of policy informatics. We explore human centered participatory platforms for facilitating deliberations on policy issues. When individuals and groups seek to collaborate to resolve policy issues, competing interests and adversarial positions on issues as well as an unawareness of the others’ perspectives often result in poor outcomes. Empathy is the act of imagining, understanding, and actively responding to the conditions and perspectives of another related to a particular situation. Therefore, generating and disseminating a strong feeling of empathy among members in these policy networks is crucial for mitigating conflicts. However, empathy generation and transfer is a complex challenge that requires systematic research within the design of participatory platforms. A thoughtful application of information systems (IS) can help bring diverse stakeholders together and promote cooperation. Human centered IS platforms facilitate richer communication channels and timely feedback to generate a sense of shared community to pursue shared goals. Interactive computer simulations is a form human centered participatory platform, which enables construction of synthetic environments for policy deliberation, and provides participants with an opportunity to jointly explore the decision space to understand the claims of other participants as legitimate.

Reference: Krishnamurthy, R., Desouza, K.C., Johnston, E.W., and Bhagwatwar, A. “A Glimpse into Policy Informatics: The Case of Participatory Platforms that Generate Synthetic Empathy,” Communications of the AIS, Forthcoming.

Recent Visit to IIT-Kanpur – A Summary

Core Team Members (from left to right) Mr. Rahul Yadav, Prof. K.K. Bajpai, Prof. Onkar Dikshit, Prof. Sudhir Misra, Dr. Ralph Hall, Dr. Michael Garvin, Ms. Yehyun An, Dr. Kevin C. Desouza, and Prof. Mukesh Sharma

Ralph Hall has provided a nice summary of our recent visit to IIT Kanpur. I enjoyed my time in Kanpur and look forward to seeing this partnership flourish. To read more about the trip, please click here.

Joining the Board of Alliance for Innovation

I am heading to Williamsburg, VA for the Alliance for Innovation Board Meeting and the Big Ideas Conference. I recently joined the Alliance for Innovation Board of Directors.

Arizona State University (ASU) is a core member of the Alliance for Innovation (AFI), and houses the administrative offices of the AFI at the College of Public Programs. The AFI brings together leading city and county managers who have an appetite for innovation. It serves as a platform for local governments who are passionate about nurturing an innovative culture and building better communities throughout the US and Canada. The Alliance maintains a loyal membership of approximately 400 local governments who employ more than 9,000 employees who take advantage of AFI on-line and in-person services. It hosts two annual conferences every year – Transforming Local government (TLG) which features case studies of the most innovative programs introduced in member governments and the BIG Ideas event where a select group of 100 “thought leaders” come together in a provocative venue to explore emerging issues facing local communities. It operates with another strategic partner, the International City County Manager Association (ICMA), the on-line Knowledge Network which currently has more than 35,000 local government users that provide content, create groups of interest and query one another about best practices. AFI also has a robust learning program through regular webinars and regional workshops. The AFI network can be mobilized to test out innovations that arise from the research, provide seek feedback on research outcomes, and even in the securing of complementary resources. The AFI will also serve as a valuable conduit for disseminating the findings from the research project.