IZA – Inst. for Labor Econ. Working Paper – Childcare Reviews on Yelp.com

New working paper available from IZA - Institute for Labor Economics.

What Do Parents Value in a Child Care Provider? Evidence from Yelp Consumer Reviews - IZA Discussion Paper No. 11741. Click here to download.

This paper exploits novel data and empirical methods to examine parental preferences for
child care. Specifically, we analyze consumer reviews of child care businesses posted on the
website Yelp.com. A key advantage of Yelp is that it contains a large volume of unstructured
information about a broad set of child care programs located in demographically and
economically diverse communities. Thus our analysis relies on a combination of theoryand
data-driven methodologies to organize and classify the characteristics of child care
that are assessed by parents. We also use natural language processing techniques to
examine the affect and psychological tones expressed in the reviews. Our main results are
threefold. First, we find that consumers overall are highly satisfied with their child care
provider, although those in higher-income markets are substantially more satisfied than
their counterparts in lower-income markets. Second, the program characteristics most
commonly evaluated by consumers relate to safety, quality of the learning environment,
and child-teacher interactions. However, lower- and higher-income consumers evaluate
different characteristics in their reviews. The former is more likely to comment on a
program’s practical features, such as its pricing and accessibility, while the latter is more
likely to focus on the learning environment. Finally, we find that consumers in lowerincome
markets are more likely to display negative psychological tones such as anxiety and
anger in their reviews, particularly when discussing the nature of their interactions with
program managers and their child’s interactions with teachers.

Startup Village 2018 – Moscow, Russia

I am looking forward to visiting Moscow to deliver a keynote at the Startup Village 2018. Hosted by the Skolkovo Foundation in collaboration with the Foundation’s partners, Startup Village is the largest startup conference for technology entrepreneurs in Russia and the CIS countries. Since its launch, Startup Village has proven itself to be a unique platform where startup founders and innovators meet successful entrepreneurs, investors, large technology corporations, and representatives of city administration to discuss technological trends, ideas, and the nurturing of the next generation of Russian entrepreneurs. This global event annually brings together thousands of participants from all over the world, hosting more than 15,000 participants within two days in 2017.

Mechanics for the Future – Salzburg Global Forum

Credit: Salzburg Global Seminar/Ela Grieshaber.

I am looking forward to participating in the Mechanics for the Future: How Can Governments Transform Themselves? session at the Salzburg Global Forum.

Governments worldwide are under pressure to meet complex needs as populations age, countries urbanize, and technology transforms lives and work. They have lead responsibility to prepare their societies for a radically changing world, yet face shrinking budgets and declining trust in the public sector. The machinery of government has changed, requiring governments to transform themselves, both in terms of the methodology they use and the people needed to implement the change.  What is the role of government in driving innovation?  How can countries and cities learn from each other?  How can governments recruit and retain the best people in public service with the right skills?  How can governments better harness the market, and strengthen constructive partnerships with civil society and the private sector?  What types of public communication work best to rebuild public trust?

See here for a list of attendees.

As part of the meeting, I will be leading a discussion on the potential for advances in artificial intelligence (AI) to transform how we govern. We will employ a case study that I co-authored with Richard T. Watson (Regents Professor and the J. Rex Fuqua Distinguished Chair for Internet Strategy, University of Georgia). The case study takes place in a country, Intelligensia, and is focused on deploying AI systems to modernize the national healthcare system and improve quality of life outcomes.

Distinguished Nonresident Research Fellow – China Institute for Urban Governance, Shanghai Jiao Tong University

I have accepted a three year appointment as a Distinguished Nonresident Research Fellow at the China Institute for Urban Governance (CIUG) at Shanghai Jiao Tong University (SJTU). I am looking forward to working with colleagues at SJTU to launch new research endeavors that advance urban innovation.

Related:

Cutter Business Technology Journal – Special Issue on Artificial Intelligence

New article in Cutter Business Technology Journal with Lena Waizenegger (Auckland University of Technology) and Gregory S. Dawson (Arizona State University)

9 Recommendations for Designing, Developing, Deploying, and Refining Cognitive Computing Systems

This article draws your attention to the design, development, deployment, and refinement of cognitive computing systems (CCSs). While CCSs are deployed in a variety of fields yielding benefits exceeding expectations, there are also major failures. Lack of appreciation for the differences inherent in developing a CCS versus a traditional software system is key to these failures. To assist in developing successful CCSs and to derive benefits from them, the authors offer a set of nine key recommendations based on their examination of over two dozen systems. They conclude that CCSs will be a dominant technology that will permeate all business operations for the foreseeable future.

Delivering Artificial Intelligence in Government – New IBM Center for the Business of Government Report

The IBM Center for the Business of Government released my new report today.

Delivering Artificial Intelligence in Government: Challenges and Opportunities

This report reviews recent progress made in applying artificial intelligence to public sector service provision, drawing on lessons learned from commercial experience as well as burgeoning cognitive computing activity by Federal, State, local, and international governments.

To access the report, please click here.

Saud Alashri, Ph.D. (Computer Science) – Arizona State University

Congrats to Saud Alashri on defending his dissertation. Saud will receive his Ph.D in Computer Science from the Fulton Schools of Engineering at Arizona State University. He will be joining King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST) as an assistant professor.

Thesis Title: Detecting Frames and Causal Relationships in Climate Change Related Text Databases Based on Semantic Features

Committee: Hasan Davulcu (Chair), Kevin C. Desouza,  Ross Maciejewski, Sharon Hsiao